Mês: abril 2017

Russia and USA

Russia Has Its Own Destiny… The U.S.’s demonizing of Moscow will not stop Russia from seeking a multipolar world order based on respect for national sovereignty. Washington must come to terms with this — or get out of the way   Valeria Z. Nollan Sat., Apr. 01, 2017 Wildfires of Russophobia have been raging in the West since the failure of the U.S./EU’s regime-change activities in Ukraine that peaked on February 18, 2014.  The events leading up to this coup are among the best-documented in regime-change history. (1) The intercepted phone call between then Assistant Secretary for European Affairs Victoria Nuland and then U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Geoffrey Pyatt is well known, in which they discussed which persons to put “in play” and how “to glue this thing.” (2)  Pres. Obama admitted in a CNN interview that the U.S. had “brokered a deal to transition power in Ukraine.” (3) Events went awry, because the Ukrainian coup government included strong fascist elements that carried out systematic violence against the Russian-speaking populations of the Donbas territory and Crimea.  Crimea, through a legitimate referendum, reunified with Russia. The rest, as the saying goes, is history. The West has chosen not to admit its appalling transgressions against Ukraine, finding it more convenient to blame Russia and hide behind spurious accusations only the ill-informed would believe.  The various waves of U.S. / EU sanctions...

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Donald Trump

Donald Trump’s Climate Fantasies   Jeffrey D. Sachs Mar. 31, 2017   NEW YORK – Legend holds that King Canute brought his flatterers to the sea to show them that even a king could not command the ocean waves, that the laws of nature are more powerful than the decrees of men. So pity Donald Trump, who really believes that his executive orders can hold back the tides. Trump is surrounded by cronies rather than flatterers, and they and their foolish, ignorant king believe that by denying climate change they can restore the wealth and glory of coal, oil, and gas. They are wrong. Greed will not reverse human-caused climate change, and Trump’s executive orders will not stop the global process of phasing out coal, oil, and gas in favor of wind, solar, hydro, nuclear, geothermal, and other low-carbon energy sources. In less than 100 days, we have learned that Trump is a man living in a fantasy world. He issues decrees, barks orders, sends out midnight Tweets, but to no avail. The facts – real ones, not his “alternative” variety – keep intervening. There is physics; there is law; there are courts; there are procedures; and there are voters, only 36% of whom approve of Trump’s job performance. There is also China, which wins technologically and diplomatically from every self-defeating move by the incompetent US president. The latest fantasy involves climate change....

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USA

O Mundo Sem a América Richard N. Haass April 30, 2013   NOVA IORQUE – Deixem-me propor uma ideia radical: a ameaça mais crítica que os Estados Unidos enfrentam hoje e no futuro previsível não é uma China ascendente, uma Coreia do Norte imprudente, um Irão nuclear, o terrorismo moderno, ou as alterações climáticas. Apesar de todas estas serem ameaças potenciais ou actuais, os maiores desafios que os EUA enfrentam são a sua dívida em expansão, o desmoronamento das suas infra-estruturas, escolas primárias e secundárias de segunda categoria, um sistema de imigração desactualizado, e um crescimento económico lento – em resumo, os alicerces internos do poder Americano. Os leitores de outros países podem sentir-se tentados a reagir a este julgamento com uma dose de gozo pela desgraça alheia (NdT: schadenfreude, em alemão no original), recolhendo mais do que uma pequena satisfação nas dificuldades Americanas. Tal resposta não devia surpreender. Os EUA e aqueles que os representam têm sido culpados de arrogância (NdT: hubris, em grego no original) (os EUA podem frequentemente ser a nação indispensável, mas seria melhor se outros o confirmassem), e exemplos de inconsistência entre as práticas da América e os seus princípios implicam compreensivelmente acusações de hipocrisia. Quando a América não adere aos princípios que prega aos outros, isso gera ressentimento. Mas, como a maioria das tentações, o regozijo relativo às imperfeições e desafios da América deve ser contrariado....

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Literatura

A selection of stories from The New Yorker’s archive The Story Behind the Novel Where do novels come from? Great ones seem almost miraculous; it’s amazing to think that each rich world was created within a single mind. This week, we bring you stories about novelists and their imaginative work. Hilton Als shows us how Toni Morrison wrote “The Bluest Eye” and “Beloved”; Larissa MacFarquhar ventures into the haunted, historical universe of Hilary Mantel. Thomas Mallon chronicles the making of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” while Margaret Talbot explores the passions behind Patricia Highsmith’s “The Price of Salt,” which was adapted into the film “Carol.” Finally, Louis Menand unearths the history and politics behind Richard Condon’s “The Manchurian Candidate,” and Anthony Burgess himself, in an essay originally written in 1973, explains how he came up with the idea for “A Clockwork Orange.” A novel, Burgess writes, might be inspired by an “uncontainable concern or anger with something taking place in the real world.” Novelists, in other words, do more than invent and fantasize. They try to see reality more clearly than the rest of us. —David Remnick A Critic at Large|September 15, 2003 Brainwashed Richard Condon’s “The Manchurian Candidate” came out in 1959 and was a best-seller. It was praised in the Times (“a wild, vigorous, curiously readable melange”) and The New Yorker(“a wild and exhilarating satire”); Time named it one of the Ten Best...

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