Mês: dezembro 2015

Ex-operário, tradutor conclui trabalho com os ‘cinco elefantes’ de Dostoiévski

RODOLFO VIANA DE SÃO PAULO 30/12/2015  02h00 Fiódor Dostoiévski (1821-1881) estava morto havia 80 anos quando Paulo Bezerra, paraibano de Pedra Lavrada, o encontrou pela primeira vez. Na época, o nordestino radicado em São Paulo, então um militante de 21 anos do PCB (Partido Comunista Brasileiro), só tinha lido um livro na vida, “A Lã e a Neve”, do português Ferreira de Castro. Por sugestão de uma amiga do Partidão, resolveu, em 1961, encarar “Crime e Castigo” na tradução das edições francesa e espanhola feita por Rosário Fusco e publicada pela José Olympio. Fabio Teixeira/Folhapress Paulo Bezerra em seu apartamento no bairro da Tijuca, no Rio de Janeiro “Entendi muito pouco, mas fiquei fascinado com a história de Raskólnikov e o clima do romance”, lembra. Cinco anos depois, Bezerra imaginou, pela primeira vez, verter “Crime e Castigo” para o português direto do russo. Era um aluno de tradução da Universidade Estatal de Moscou, quando encontrou a mesma edição da José Olympio numa biblioteca. Aproveitou para cotejar com o original russo a versão de Rosário Fusco. “Foi impressionante: era como se autores diferentes contassem a mesma história, cada um a seu modo”, diz. Trinta e cinco anos depois do vislumbre foi lançada pela editora 34 a tradução de Bezerra para o clássico de 1866 –a primeira versão direta do russo publicada no Brasil. Ali começou a saga de verter diretamente da...

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Boris Gryzlov and Ukraine: Russia brings on a Heavy-Weight

Appointment of Boris Gryzlov to represent Russia on the Contact Group brings a key Russian decision maker into the heart of the crisis. Alexander Mercouris  Mon, Dec 28, 2015    That the Russian leadership continues to accord the Ukrainian conflict the highest importance is confirmed by a very interesting appointment the Kremlin has just announced. This is the appointment of Boris Gryzlov as Russia’s representative on the so-called Contact Group. The Contact Group was set up in June 2014 as a result of the talks in Normandy between Putin, Poroshenko, Merkel and Hollande. Its original purpose was to help put into effect the peace plan Poroshenko was expected to announce later that month. In the event Poroshenko’s peace plan proved a major disappointment, amounting to nothing more than a demand the east Ukrainians disarm unilaterally and their leaders flee to Russia, in return for the vaguest possible promise of eventual “decentralisation”, with no explanation either of what that meant or of the process whereby it would be achieved. Unsurprisingly, Poroshenko’s peace was rejected by the east Ukrainians and by the Russians (who called it – correctly – an ultimatum rather than a peace plan).  However it limped on as a sort of convenient fiction until the Battle of Debaltsevo.  The Minsk Protocol of September 2014 was supposedly an amendment of it. Poroshenko’s peace plan was replaced by the Minsk Agreement of...

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Amid Airstrikes In Syria, US Officials Admire Russia’s Cost-Effective Military Campaign

BY  CHRISTOPHER HARRESS  @CHARRESS  ON 12/28/15 AT 2:08 PM Russian military engineers working on an airbase in Syria. PHOTO: REUTERS/MINISTRY OF DEFENCE OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION    Senior members of the U.S. administration have praised Russia’s successful and cost-effective military campaign in Syria, undermining U.S. President Barack Obama’s statements from earlier this year that Moscow’s involvement in the war and attempts to prop up Syrian President Bashar Assad’s government would drain its resources and see its military stuck in a long, drawn-out fight. “I think it’s indisputable that the Assad regime, with Russian military support, is probably in a safer position than it was,” a senior administration official who asked to remain anonymous told Reuters on Monday. Five other unidentified U.S. officials interviewed by Reuters also said Moscow’s mission had been successful so far while successfully keeping costs low. Since Russia became militarily involved in the Syrian war at the end of September, it’s estimated that its annual costs will come in at about $1-2 billion, which it has managed to cover using its annual military budget of $54 billion rather than needing to borrow or take from other sources. Russian Military Expenditure Over Time | FindTheData A separate analysis puts the cost closer to $3 billion, citing the downing of the Russian aircraft by a Turkish jet in November as the primary reason for the increase in cost. Moscow was forced to bring in advanced missile...

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Obama Scrambles To Create “New ISIS Narrative” After Putin Embarrasses Washington

  Submitted by Tyler Durden on 12/27/2015 21:35 -0400 One of the most amusing things about Russia’s headlong plunge into Syria’s five-year conflict is the extent to which it effectively represented Moscow calling time on Washington’s strategy of seeking to bring about regime change in the Mid-East by intentionally destabilizing otherwise strong (if not always benign) governments. Until September 30 – which is the day a three star Russian general strolled into the US embassy in Baghdad and informed the staff that airstrikes in Syria begin “in one hour” – Washington, Riyadh, Ankara, and Doha seemed perfectly content to simply wait around for one group of rebels or another to finally succeed in taking Damascus. In the meantime, the US embarked on what one might call a “containment” strategy as it related to ISIS – the idea, basically, was to keep Frankenstein confined to the lab, but not to hit the monster hard enough to render it ineffectual in the fight to destabilize the Assad government. Once Assad fell, the US would march in and “liberate” the country before promptly installing a puppet government – with the help of the Saudis of course. All of that changed when the Russians arrived in Latakia. Once Moscow’s warplanes began to turn the tide in favor of the SAA with the help of Hezbollah ground forces and the IRGC, Putin promptly moved to blow...

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Week Twelve of the Russian Intervention in Syria: Zag!

THE SAKER DECEMBER 26, 2015 In last week’s review of the Russian military intervention in Syria I wrote that Kerry had lost every single negotiation he ever had with the Russians and that he had a record of agreeing to A only to come back to the US and then declare non-A. This time again, the Americans did not change their modus operandi, except that it was Obama himself who declared, yet again, that Assad must go, resulting in some commentators speaking of a “White House Schizophrenia”. Others, however, noted that this could be simply a case of face saving denials. Personally, I think that both of these explanations are correct. There is no doubt that Obama is an exceptionally weak, and even clueless, President. The man has proven to have no vision, no understanding of international relations, his culture is minimal while his arrogance appears to be infinite – he is all about form over substance. This is the ideal mix to win a Presidential election in the USA, but once in the White House this is also a recipe for disaster. When such a non-entity is placed at the top of the Executive branch of government, the different part of government do not get a clear message of what the policy is and, as a result, they each begin doing their own thing without worrying too much about what...

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