Autor: João

As Syrian-Russian Coalition Advances, Cynics Prepare for ‘Moscow’s Defeat’

© Sputnik/ Valery Melnikov OPINION 21:06 09.01.2016(updated 21:33 09.01.2016) In 2015, the Syrian Army, supported by its Russian and Iranian allies, as well as by militants from Lebanon’s Hezbollah, managed to halt the advance of the Daesh (ISIL/ISIS) terror state. Now, three months after Russia’s intervention, The Atlantic magazine whimsically ponders whether 2016 could become the year that ‘Putin’s war finally unravels’. In the last three months of 2015, the Russian Aerospace Defense Forces deployed to Syria, smashing thousands of terrorist targets and assisting the Syrian Army in launching a series of tactical offensives across the front, resulting in important victories in the provinces of Aleppo, Latakia, Hama, Idleb, Homs and the suburbs of Damascus. According to a recent report by the Syrian General Staff, the support of Russian aviation has helped the Army launch a large-scale offensive for the first time in four years, resulting in the liberation of 80 towns and villages, and over 500 square km of territory. In the meantime, the Syrian Democratic Forces, a diverse coalition of Syrian anti-jihadist forces including the Kurdish YPG and YPJ, recently receiving Russian air support, has launched an offensive on the de facto Daesh capital of Al-Raqqah in northern Syria. © SPUTNIK/ DMITRY VINOGRADOV Daesh’s 90-Day Nightmare: Results of Russia’s 2015 Syrian Operation More importantly, analysts have suggested, the support of Russian aviation has helped the Syrian Army and allied forces to rest and regroup after over five years of brutal war against dozens of opponents, including literally hundreds of jihadist groups, armed and supported by powerful interests stretching from Saudi Arabia and Qatar to Turkey and the United States.The task...

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World Powers Scramble to Assert Themselves in Antarctica

The globe’s last unsettled continent is full of resources waiting to be tapped – and Russia is among the powers vying for control Simon Romero  (New York Times)  Fri, Jan 8, 2016 Originally appeared: New York Times South Korea’s Jang Bogo research station On a glacier-filled island with fjords and elephant seals, Russia has built Antarctica’s first Orthodox church on a hill overlooking its research base, transporting the logs all the way from Siberia. Less than an hour away by snowmobile, Chinese laborers have updated the Great Wall Station, a linchpin in China’s plan to operate five bases on Antarctica,...

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Russia in Syria

The Danger of Putin Losing in Syria If Russia’s military adventure unravels, what happens next?   Dominic Tierney Jan. 08, 2016 Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks to military officials in Moscow Last September, Russia deployed dozens of jets to Syria to rescue the ailing regime of Bashar al-Assad. Vladimir Putin aimed to protect one of Moscow’s few foreign allies and gain leverage for the coming peace negotiations over the Syrian Civil War. Russian media presented the mission as a heroic attempt to save the civilized world from Islamic terrorism. In Washington, however, Putin was widely seen as wading into a quagmire. According to The Economist: “If America’s Syria-watchers agree on anything it is that the Russian campaign, which has enabled Mr Assad’s forces to make only minor gains, will fail, and thereby encourage Russia to give up on its proxy. That would be a huge boost to the UN-backed peace talks John Kerry, the secretary of state, is brokering, with the aim of replacing Mr Assad with a transitional government early next year.” But would a loss for Putin really be good news? While it’s tempting to take satisfaction in the Russian president’s travails in Syria—what you might call Putinfreude—Syria-watchers should question their assumptions. If Putin’s military adventure unravels, the result may not be peace. It’s certainly easy to imagine the Russian intervention deteriorating. In recent weeks, Assad’s forces have made some limited gains around...

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The Rule Of Law No Longer Exists In Western Civilization

January 5, 2016 Paul Craig Roberts My work documenting how the law was lost began about a quarter of a century ago. A close friend and distinguished attorney, Dean Booth, first brought to my attention the erosion of the legal principles on which rests the rule of law in the United States. My columns on the subject got the attention of an educational institution that invited me to give a lecture on the subject. Subsequently, I was invited to give a lecture on “How The Law Was Lost” at the Benjamin Cardozo School of Law in New York City. The work coalesced into a book, The Tyranny Of Good Intentions, coauthored with my research associate, Lawrence M. Stratton, published in 2000, with an expanded edition published in 2008. We were able to demonstrate that Sir Thomas More’s warning about prosecutors and courts disregarding law in order to more easily convict undesirables and criminals has had the result of turning law away from being a shield of the people and making it into a weapon in the hands of government. That is what we witness in the saga of the Hammonds, long-time ranchers in the Harney Basin of Oregon. With the intervention of Ammon Bundy, another rancher who suffered illegal persecution by the Bureau of Land Management but stood them off with help from armed militia, and his supporters, the BLM’s...

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1971 War: How Russia Sank Nixon’s Gunboat Diplomacy

Exactly 40 years ago, India won a famous victory over Pakistan due to its brilliant soldiers, an unwavering political leadership, and strong diplomatic support from Moscow. Less well known is Russia’s power play that prevented a joint British-American attack on India Rakesh Krishnan Simha  (Russia & India Report)  08/01/2016 This article originally appearedat Russia & India Report Washington DC, December 3, 1971, 10:45am. US President Richard Nixon is on the phone with Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, hours after Pakistan launched simultaneous attacks on six Indian airfields, a reckless act that prompted India to declare war. Nixon: So West Pakistan giving trouble there. Kissinger: If they lose half of their country without fighting they will be destroyed. They may also be destroyed this way but they will go down fighting. Nixon: The Pakistan thing makes your heart sick. For them to be done so by the Indians and after we have warned the bitch (reference to Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi). Tell them that when India talks about West Pakistan attacking them it’s like Russia claiming to be attacked by Finland. Washington, December 10, 1971, 10:51am. A week later the war is not going very well for Pakistan, as Indian armour scythes through East Pakistan and the Pakistan Air Force is blown out of the subcontinent’s sky. Meanwhile, the Pakistani military in the west is demoralised and on the verge of collapse as the Indian...

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