Autor: João

Senadores do PMDB resistem a acordo com Temer para sucessão do partido

Pedro Ladeira – 9.dez.15/Folhapress O vice-presidente Michel Temer, que teme perder o comando da Executiva Nacional do PMDB GUSTAVO URIBE DÉBORA ÁLVARES DE BRASÍLIA 14/01/2016  14h49 – Atualizado às 16h28   Apesar dos esforços do vice-presidente Michel Temer em se aproximar da bancada do PMDB no Senado a fim de evitar uma disputa interna pelo comando nacional da sigla, os senadores peemedebistas resistem a aceitar acordo oferecido pelo peemedebista. Como antecipou a Folha na terça-feira (12), Temer está preocupado em perder o comando do partido e está disposto a ceder espaço na Executiva Nacional do PMDB ao grupo do presidente do Senado, Renan Calheiros (PMDB-AL), que também pretende disputar o comando da legenda. Para evitar a candidatura rival, o vice-presidente ofereceu a manutenção do líder do PMDB, Eunicio Oliveira (CE), no cargo de tesoureiro e o posto de primeiro vice-presidente a Romero Jucá (RR), cargo atualmente ocupado pelo senador Valdir Raupp (RO). A oferta, no entanto, é considerada insuficiente pela bancada do PMDB no Senado. Os senadores do partido exigem mais espaço no comando da legenda, bem como maior representação de seus Estados. Temer nega que tenha feito a oferta aos senadores. Segundo ele, na verdade, foi feito um convite para que conversem pessoalmente sobre a disputa interna. “O que temos que fazer é encontrar entendimento dentro de nossas divergências”, afirmou Eunício. Além de abrir espaço ao Senado Federal, o vice-presidente também está trabalhando com...

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How Russian Engineering Made Current Syria Operation Possible

The Russian way to make smart bombs The Saker  (The Vineyard of the Saker)  13.Jan.2016 Originally appeared: The Vineyard of the Saker The SVP-24 guidance system The pace and effectiveness of the Russian Air Force (well, technically they are now called AirSpace Forces or ASF so I will refer to them as RASF from now on) has the western military experts in shock. Not only are the number of sorties per day about 3 times as much as a US or NATO country could achieve, but the Russian airstrikes are amazingly accurate even though the Russians are flying at over 5000m above ground, well out of reach of man portable air defense systems (MANPADS). They are even flying at night and in bad weather. This is even more puzzling considering that most of the work, at least in quantitative terms, is done by old SU-24s (first deployed in 1974) and SU-25 (first deployed in 1981). In fact, most of the missions in Syria could have been executed by these two excellent but, frankly, ancient aircraft and the main reason for the presence of the brand new and extremely advanced SU-34 is to test out the airframe and its systems (and since the Turks shot down the SU-24, to provide credible air-to-air self defense capability where needed). So what is the deal here? How did the Russians achieve these apparently quasi-miraculous...

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Obama Confronts Americans’ Fears in State of the Union Speech

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and MICHAEL D. SHEARJAN. 12, 2016 WASHINGTON — President Obama on Tuesday set forth an ambitious vision for America’s future but conceded his own failure to heal the political divisions holding back progress, calling it a lasting disappointment of his tenure. In a prime-time televised speech that avoided the usual litany of policy prescriptions, Mr. Obama used his final State of the Union address to paint a hopeful portrait of the nation after seven years of his leadership, with a resurgent economy and better standing in the world despite inequality at home and terrorism abroad. But Mr. Obama, who campaigned for president on promises of hope and change, and vowed when he took office to transform Washington and politics itself, accepted responsibility for falling far short of that goal. “It’s one of the few regrets of my presidency, that the rancor and suspicion between the parties has gotten worse instead of better,” Mr. Obama said, adding that “a president with the gifts of Lincoln or Roosevelt might have better bridged the divide.” He acknowledged that many Americans feel frightened and shut out of a political and economic system they view as rigged against their interests, even as he offered an implicit rebuke of Republicans who are playing on those insecurities in the race to succeed him. “As frustration grows, there will be voices urging us to fall back into tribes, to scapegoat...

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Is it Really Russia that’s Isolated, Mr. President?

Obama’s State of the Union as an exercise in national denial Deena Stryker  13.Jan.2016 Listening to President Obama’s last State of the Union speech, I was reminded of the country that was my second home: having spent a total of thirty years living in France, I have a Ph.D in the study of national denial: when I first arrived there as a child in 1948, France still ruled Indochina, Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco and a host of other third world countries. Britain had its Commonwealth, but France, as De Gaulle never tired of saying, had its ‘rayonnement’. The seven foot tall general led the French resistance to German occupation from London, ruled France after the Liberation, then again in the late fifties when he designed the Presidential Vth Republic and steered France out of its North African colonies – and NATO.  De Gaulle was to twentieth century France what George Washington and Abe Lincoln combined are to the United Sates: a country’s enduring image of itself with a halo. The political class in France coped with their country’s terminal decline after World War II by mocking and denigrating the United States: Americans were loud and ignorant, and they were going to destroy Europe’s unique culture! The earliest modern graffiti was probably the popular slogan “US Go Home!” Europe’s Opinion-Makers Pledge Allegiance But by the early 1980’s, Fulbright and other government-sponsored programs...

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COUNTERVIEW: Russia’s Economic Woes Are Just Beginning

Holding one’s breath for a 2016 recovery may be hazardous to health. Radical measures may be needed Jacob Dreizin  14.Jan.2016 The exchange rate panic of late 2014 – a sign of things to come? The Economy Analysis of Russia’s short-to-medium term economic direction—both in the West and in Russia itself—almost invariably involves a narrow focus on the “headline” price of oil—as in, how will Russia do at $30/barrel vs. $50/barrel, what price will balance its budget, etc. (This is partly because Russia’s economy is still rather opaque—Moscow’s econometric data is neither as diverse nor as frequently updated as the West’s—and partly because its business papers do not, for the most part, have the resources or expertise to do focused journalism, instead running mostly non-financial/economic content like any other outlet, or at best, press-release-based news on acquisitions, who is suing whom for unpaid electric bills, etc.) As usual, reality is more nuanced. First, we must understand that the oil price carried in the headlines is the cost of “front month” (i.e. nearest expiration) delivery of “Light Sweet Crude” (a.k.a. West Texas Intermediate-grade/WTI), Brent, or some other origin/type/blend of oil (depending on where you are in the world and what headlines you read), facilitated through a given futures market/clearinghouse such as the NYMEX (again depending on your location/focus.) This is not necessarily what Russia or any other major producer receives for...

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