Autor: João

Vladimir Putin

 Putin Blues   Israel Shamir Dec. 23, 2015   Heavy darkness befalls the North; the sun rarely emerges from between the clouds. This year, Russia has noticeably less street illumination, and the spirits are anything but festive. Only the whiteness of the snow and Christmas trees break the gloom and remind us of the forthcoming low point of the cosmic wheel, Yuletide, when days starts to wax and nights to wane. As this stellar event foretells the Nativity of our Savior, this is a period of hope after a very difficult year, all over the world. Putin supporters are unhappy The Russians keep guessing what President Putin will tell them in his traditional televised address to the nation at the break of the New Year. He should say, this year is over, and we shall all cheer, people propose. Even the most optimistic ones are disappointed by lacklustre economic performance, and they blame the government of Prime Minister Medvedev and his liberal monetarist team. Meanwhile Putin rises above the blame game, but the government is less and less popular. As the Rouble drops, even the rather pro-Kremlin mass-circulation newspaper KP (full disclosure: I write an occasional column for the KP) published a call for the economy and finance ministers to resign or to be fired. There is a very little chance that Mr Putin will take this advice and clean his government...

Ler mais

The Politics of Oil

Record Russian Oil Production as Saudi Gambit Fails   Zero Hedge Tue, Dec 22, 2015 In late October, we noted that for the second time this year, Russia overtook Saudi Arabia as the biggest exporter of crude to China. Russia also took the top spot in May, marking the first time in history that Moscow beat out Riyadh when it comes to crude exports to Beijing. “Moscow is wrestling with crippling Western economic sanctions and building closer ties with Beijing is key to mitigating the pain,” we said in October, on the way to explaining that closer ties between Russia and China as it relates to energy are part and parcel of a burgeoning relationship between the two countries who have voted together on the Security Council on matters of geopolitical significance. Here’s a look at the longer-term trend: You may also recall that Gazprom Neft (which is the number three oil producer in Russia) began settling all sales to China in yuan starting in January. This, we said, is yet another sign of the petrodollar’s imminent demise.On Monday, we learn that for the third time in 2015, Russia has once again bested the Saudis for the top spot on China’s crude suppliers list. “Russia overtook Saudi Arabia for the third time this year in November as China’s largest crude oil supplier,” Reuters writes, adding that “China brought in about 949,925 barrels per day (bpd) of Russian crude...

Ler mais

Russia in Syria

Week Eleven of the Russian Intervention in Syria: A Step Back from the Brink?   The Saker Dec. 19, 2015 This has been an amazing week. While last week I concluded that “The only way to avoid a war is to finally give up, even if that is initially denied publicly, on the “Assad must go” policy”. Now it is true that various US officials, including Kerry, did make statements about the fact that Assad need not go right now, that a “transition” was important or that “the institutions of the state” had to be preserved, but of course what I, and many others really meant, was that the US needed to fundamentally change its policy towards the Syrian conflict. Furthermore, since Turkey committed an act of war against Russia under the “umbrella” of the US and NATO, this also created a fantastically dangerous situation in which a rogue state like Turkey could have the impression of impunity because of its membership in NATO. Here again, what was needed was not just a positive statement, but a fundamental change in US policy. There is a possibility that this fundamental change might have happened this week. Others have a very different interpretation of what took place and I am not categorically affirming that it did – only time will show – but at least it is possible that it has....

Ler mais

Putin’s 2015 Foreign Policy Score Card

DEC 21, 2015 1:54 PM EST By Leonid Bershidsky United Nations Security Council Resolution 2254, which laid out the map of a peace process in Syria, crowns a year of risky gambles for Russian President Vladimir Putin. Most of these played out badly for ordinary Russians, but Putin himself appears to have improved his international standing after an ugly 2014, carving out a clear — though not necessarily enviable — new role for Russia in world affairs. In 2014, Putin became a near-pariah. After Russia annexed Crimea from Ukraine, the leaders of what used to be the Group of Eight decided to cancel a meeting in Sochi and agreed to hit Russia with weak but humiliating economic sanctions. The U.N. General Assembly passed a resolution stating the annexation was illegal, and only 10 countries — including North Korea, Zimbabwe, Venezuela and Sudan — backed Russia by voting against it. China and India abstained, though, and Putin decided he could pivot toward his partners in Asia, demonstrating that “the West” and “the world” are not synonyms. Vladimir Putin: Russia’s Most Popular Man Russia also signed some long-term energy deals with China in 2014, but they fell short of forming a solid anti-Western alliance. The crash of a Malaysian plane in eastern Ukraine, apparently shot down by Moscow-backed rebels, made things worse. A Moscow-approved Ukraine cease-fire didn’t work. At a Group of 20 summit in Australia in November, other world...

Ler mais

Demissões em massa impulsionam reclamações trabalhistas no Brasil

Gabriela Di Bella/Folhapress Marcus Lemos, empresário que recebeu carro de som na porta da loja com reclamações de trabalhadora CLAUDIA ROLLI JOANA CUNHA DE SÃO PAULO 20/12/2015  02h00 Com o aumento do desemprego e da dificuldade financeira das empresas, escritórios de advocacia e sindicatos notam incremento de até 30% no número de ações trabalhistas ajuizadas ou nas consultas sobre processos. A tendência é que cresça mais à medida que a retração econômica se agrave e as demissões, antes concentradas no setor industrial, se espalhem por outras atividades. O impacto das ações tem sido mais sentido por indústrias que estão sofrendo a crise com maior intensidade. Caso da construção civil, do setor automobilístico e do de óleo e gás. Mas segmentos da área de prestação de serviços, como o de bares e restaurantes, também já identificam maior número de demitidos ingressando no Judiciário. Antonio Carlos Frugis, sócio do Demarest Advogados, afirma que setores como o automobilístico sofrem mais e que um cliente recebeu mais de cem ações em um único mês. Frugis diz que algumas companhias já fizeram provisões para o custo, mas o movimento ainda não é generalizado. “Alguns provisionam imediatamente. Outros, só depois, se forem condenados”, diz o advogado. No Tribunal Regional do Trabalho da 2ª região (Grande São Paulo e Baixada Santista), um dos maiores do país, foram 386.038 novos processos de janeiro a outubro -aumento de 6,6% ante o acumulado...

Ler mais