Autor: João

Homo Sovieticus – Suspected at Home, Misjudged Abroad

Soviet and Western ideologues alike, albeit for different reasons, failed to understand the nature of soviet society Michael Kirkwood  Alexander Zinoviev  Sun, Dec 20, 2015 Professor emeritus, University of Glasgow Michael Kirkwood continues with a series of articles about the life and works of the brilliant post war Russian philosopher, author, and dissident, Alexander Zinoviev. lllustrations are by Zinoviev himself, provided to RI by his family.   The book Homo Sovieticus was published in English translation by Victor Gollancz in 1985,  the original Russian version having appeared in 1982 (L’Age d’Homme, Lausanne). It reflects Zinoviev’s earliest experience as an émigré and provides a snapshot of East-West relations at a point near the end of what might be termed “classical Soviet Communism”.  It is a scathing account of Soviet behavior abroad and of the West’s inability to comprehend the true nature of Soviet foreign policy with respect to the West. The book centres on a group of Soviet émigrés living in a Pension in Germany, each seeking his or her own way to establish a niche in the West. As in The Yawning Heights, they have labels rather than names (‘Cynic’, ‘Enthusiast’, ‘Whiner’, etc.) Given Alexander Zinoviev’s later writings (from 1987 or thereabouts onwards), there is a certain poignancy in the concern expressed by the narrator in Homo Sovieticus (a Soviet agent sent into the West), regarding the inevitability of war between East and West, and the...

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Russia’s Legacy Is an Ocean as Complex as It Is Vast

“It’s time to understand that Russia is an enormous treasure whose pieces cannot be considered in isolation” Zakhar Prilepin  (Russkaya Planeta)  Sun, Dec 20, 2015 The author is a famous Russian writer whose articles were translated in 17 languages.  This article originally appeared at Russkaya Planeta. Translated by Natalia Mojdjer The Russian legacy is not a single chapter but a collection of volumes: Pagan Russia, Orthodox Russia, the Kingdom of Moscow, the Russian Monarchy, and the Soviet Union. Russia is not only the rightful successor to the grandeur and glory of the Byzantine Empire and the keeper of the Orthodox faith. From a geographic standpoint, it is successor to the empire of Genghis Khan, and it still inhabits those original borders together with most of the nations that formed the Golden Horde. As wise men have  said, Moscow is the “Third Rome”. Russians are descendants of a number of friendly tribes that share an extraordinary collective past and an exciting future. Unlike the Yankees, we did not rid our land of its native owners, but are proud of our Tatar-Mongol legacy. Buryatia and Tatarstan, Yakutia, Bashkortostan, Kalmykia, Chuvashia, Khakassia, the Crimea, all were populated for centuries alongside Russians, by the Buryats, Volga Tatars, Crimean Tatars, Yakuts, Bashkirs Kalmyks, Kumyks, Nogai, Khakassia, Chuvash, Balkars and others, who today make up about 25% of Russia’s population. Russia consists of layered traditions from each historical period:...

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Neocons Object to Syrian Democracy

December 19, 2015 Exclusive: President Obama has infuriated Official Washington’s neocons by accepting the Russian stance that the Syrian people should select their own future leaders through free elections, rather than the neocon insistence on a foreign-imposed “regime change,” reports Robert Parry. By Robert Parry The Washington Post’s editorial board is livid that President Barack Obama appears to have accepted the Russian position that the Syrian people should decide for themselves who their future leaders should be – when the Post seems to prefer that the choice be made by neoconservative think tanks in Washington or other outsiders. So, in a furious editorial on Friday, the Post castigated Secretary of State John Kerry for saying – after a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow – that the Obama administration and Russia see the political solution to Syria “in fundamentally the same way,” meaning that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad could stand for election in the future. The Post wrote: “Unfortunately, that increasingly appears to be the case — and not because Mr. Putin has altered his position. For four years, President Obama demanded the departure of Mr. Assad, who has killed hundreds of thousands of his own people with chemical weapons, ‘barrel bombs,’ torture and other hideous acts. Yet in its zeal to come to terms with Mr. Putin, the Obama administration has been slowly retreating from that position.” The Russian position, which Obama finally seems to be...

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Soros Plays Both Ends in Syria Refugee Chaos

Since John D. Rockefeller was advised to protect his wealth from government taxation by creating a tax-exempt philanthropic foundation in 1913, foundations have been used by American oligarchs to disguise a world of dirty deeds under the cover “doing good for mankind,” known by the moniker “philanthropy” for mankind-loving. No less the case is that of George Soros who likely has more tax-exempt foundations under his belt than anyone around. His Open Society foundations are in every country where Washington wants to put ‘their man’ in, or at least get someone out who doesn’t know how to read their music. They played a key role in regime change in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe after 1989. Now his foundations are up to their eyeballs in promoting propaganda serving the US-UK war agenda for destroying stability in Syria as they did in Libya three years ago, creating the current EU refugee crisis. We should take a closer look at the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis wreaking such havoc and unrest across the EU, especially in Germany, the favored goal of most asylum seekers today. George Soros, today a naturalized American citizen, has just authored a six-point proposal telling the European Union on what they must do to manage the situation. It’s worth looking at in detail. He begins by stating, “The EU needs a comprehensive plan to respond to...

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Perspectivas 2016: Incertezas políticas, China e Fed podem levar dólar a R$ 5

 Notícia Publicada em 18/12/2015 12:42  Mudança de ministro da Fazenda adiciona preocupação com o próximo ano Questões políticas devem manter câmbio volátil em 2016 (Marcos Santos/USP Imagens) SÃO PAULO – As incertezas sobre a política brasileira devem continuar interferindo no câmbio em 2016. E, somados a isso os fatores externos, como ritmo de alta de juros dos Estados Unidos e economia chinesa, o dólar pode chegar a R$ 5 no ano que vem. O patamar indica uma valorização 19% superior à expectativa do Boletim Focus mais recente, que prevê dólar em R$ 4,20 ao fim do próximo ano. De acordo com Bernard Gonin, analista macroeconômico da Rio Gestão, apenas considerando o diferencial de juros previsto para 2016 a moeda deve alcançar R$ 4,50, com piso de R$ 3,80 na previsão mais otimista. Sidnei Moura Nehme, economista da NGO Corretora, destaca que os riscos negativos com os quais o mercado já trabalhava estão ocorrendo em uma velocidade maior que a esperada e, por isso, o câmbio deve ser o primeiro e repercutir a piora da situação do país. O rebaixamento para grau especulativo pela Fitch na última quarta-feira (16) é um dos itens que colabora para deterioração econômica. “Com downgrade, não há exagero em projetar-se o preço do câmbio em R$ 5 ao final de 2016, parecendo mesmo projeção muito sensata, já que é notória a tendência do próximo ano ser tão negativo quanto este”, explica o economista, que prevê contínua perda...

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